The Liturgical and the Ethical in Lacoste and Kierkegaard

By: ALEXANDER GILMAN The relationship between the liturgical, defined by Jean-Yves Lacoste as “the logic that presides over the encounter between man and God writ large,” and the ethical is deeply ambiguous. Throughout Lacoste’s phenomenological work, Experience and the Absolute, the call of man and the world is set in contrast with the call of the Absolute. In this text Lacoste begins with the Heideggerian notion of our being as being-in-the world-toward-death and explores how a liturgical relationship with the absolute subverts, but also sublates, our being-in-the-world in favor of a being-toward-God. Without rejecting Heidegger’s fundamental ontology, Lacoste aims to … Continue reading The Liturgical and the Ethical in Lacoste and Kierkegaard

Justified False Beliefs and Truth as a Redundant Condition

By: STEVE TENSMEYER Despite the common intuition that something is very wrong with the Gettier problems, after forty years they still seem to be intractable. The responses to these paradoxes of knowledge range from complaints against their logical structure to conclusions that knowledge simply cannot be analyzed. Most philosophers, however, take a position somewhere in between these two extremes; their responses advocate changing the traditional Justified True Belief model of knowledge to something that “de-Gettierizes” knowledge. This almost always means either adding some fourth condition or clarifying or changing the definition of justification. In this essay I will consider different … Continue reading Justified False Beliefs and Truth as a Redundant Condition

Reason and Self-Interest in Hobbes’ Reply to the Fool

By JOSEPH CARLSMITH ABSTRACT: The Fool offers a famous objection to Hobbesian ethics: if practical rationality is rooted in self-interest, then isn’t it rational to abandon ethical reasoning when doing so “conduces to one’s benefit”? In this paper, I examine Hobbes’ reply to the Fool as it reveals the limitations of the moral theory presented in Leviathan. I begin by sketching out the reply and two traditional ways of interpreting it – the “case-by-case” interpretation and the “rule-commitment” interpretation. I argue that for empirical reasons both these interpretations fail to answer the Fool’s challenge. I then turn to an interpretation … Continue reading Reason and Self-Interest in Hobbes’ Reply to the Fool

Hellfire: A Loving God, Infinite Suffering, and the Reliability of the Bible

By ERIN McDONNELL ABSTRACT: One of the most imposing problems facing the modern theist philosopher is the ‘problem of Hell,’ or the problem of how to make the Bible’s depiction of Hell as a place of eternal punishment logically consistent with the generally held theist idea that God is perfectly loving. This issue has been dealt with by a number of philosophers; some have attempted to re-imagine Hell into something less severe than eternal punishment, and some have attempted to give justifications for the traditional version of Hell. An overview of these various views and attempts will conclude that universalism—the … Continue reading Hellfire: A Loving God, Infinite Suffering, and the Reliability of the Bible

Skewed Conceptions of Happiness in N. Korea

By Harrison Lim . What is the first thought that comes to mind when you think of North Korea? For most people, including United States Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, words like “solitude,” and “Hermit Kingdom” seem to be a quite accurate description. But why do we instinctively attach an ominous stigma to the quality of life in the nation? We are surrounded by and force-fed the accounts and of the conditions in North Korea by people who have never even been to the country. Very few people have ever ventured to North Korea and the select many who have … Continue reading Skewed Conceptions of Happiness in N. Korea